Roksanda Ilincic

LFW AW14: Day 4

Ella Catliff LFW AW14 Whistles by Holly McGlynn_001

Wearing Whistles Jacket, Skirt & Jumper, Sophia Webster shoes, Marc by Marc Jacobs bag, Anne Bowes Jewellery Necklace & AllSaints Scarf
Image by Holly McGlynn

Here we have LFW AW14 Day 4, and only a casual fortnight late, result! Let’s ignore my tardiness and crack on with the matter at hand… the shows. It’s a truth universally acknowledged that LFW day 4 is “the big one”. We’re talking big shows, back to back, non stop from 9am. This season it was also the day that I had to submit my thesis 2nd draft (always during bloody fashion week, I swear they do it on purpose!) and I may have spent the previous night dancing until the wee hours at Matthew Williamson and Jonathan Saunders’ after parties, which made the 7am thesis editing particularly unpleasant. My spirits were soon lifted though as, triple shot (caffeine was much needed) Starbucks skinny latte in hand I leapt on the Piccadilly Line and headed to my first show of the day, Roksanda Ilincic.

Roksanda’s collections have been stellar since her LFW debut back in 2005 yet somehow, she manages to outdo herself time and again. AW14 proved this. The past couple of years have seen the designer moving away from the covetable, easy-to-wear cocktail dresses with which she first made her name. Don’t get me wrong, Roksanda Ilincic still does dresses and seriously great ones at that but she’s not afraid to challenge both herself and her customer. The fact she manages to do so while still creating pieces compelling enough to entice everyone from the Duchess of Cambridge to Lily Allen is a true testament to her talent.

Roksanda Ilincic AW14 LFW 1

Roksanda Ilincic AW14 (Images via Style.com)

AW14 saw Roksanda building on the artistic inspiration which underpinned her also awesome SS14 collection, offering up sculpted felted wool confections with abstract patterns in wrong-yet-right contrasting colour combinations. Making pointedly uneven hemlines appear the height of sophistication is no mean feat by any account yet in Ilincic’s capable hands, lopsided skirting smoothly bypassed bizarre and simply felt elegantly unusual. The same goes for her colour palette; neutrals, burgundy, plum, orange, cobalt and ice blue all thrown together amid , surely that should be a disaster? Yet, it works, brilliantly. As for the textures, Roksanda really pulled the stops out here. Having begun her experiment with off kilter fabrics some time around AW13, the designer’s latest concoctions involved intricate PVC woven with tartan and 3D plastic embellishment, perfectly counterbalanced by luscious furs, shearlings and lambswools.

Roksanda LFW AW14 2

Roksanda Ilincic AW14 (Images via Style.com)

Buoyed up by Roksanda’s show I trotted off up Tottenham Court Road for a presentation I was very, very excited. You’ve guessed it, Whistles. Holding a presentation in a stunningly elegant townhouse on Fitzroy Square is to some degree a risky move, especially for what is technically speaking a high street (albeit very high end high street) brand. Didn’t Jane Shepardson worry that the understated expensiveness of the surroundings might detract from collection itself? Not a bit of it, and with good reason. For AW14 Whistles delivered an array of ensembles so exquisitely perfect in their simple chicness one would have been forgiven for assuming they were the wincingly pricey produce of a bonafide luxury label. This is not to say, of course, that the pieces on show were flash. In fact they were the antithesis of bling and that was what made them so incredibly impressive. It’s easy to distract from non-designer-brand fabrics and imperfect cuts with oodles of colour and prints, but Whistles AW14 was a masterclass in polish. Delectably enveloping overcoats in tactile wools, soft shades and oversized checks tempted you to snuggle stylishly inside them. Whistles always gives good knits and this seasons jumpers came roll necked and ribbed, tucked into simple black midi skirts, worn loose over wide leg tailored trousers, and with lashings of nonchalant slouch.

LFW Whistles

LFW Whistles

After marvelling at the precision with which they had cut their pleats (seriously, it was mind boggling) I found my way into the eveningwear room and that, my friends, was the moment I knew I was done for. Thick pelted faux furs, delicately embellished tunics and peek-a-boo jumpsuits all in the most delectable shade of lilac! As for the off the shoulder, almost Dior esque sculpted co-ords and glossy navy satins… I fell hard and mentally kissed goodbye to financial solvency come August. This season Whistles had the exact same effect on me as every Phillip Lim show I attend inevitably does; it made me want a whole new wardrobe.

LFW Whistles

LFW Wistles

After the joy of seeing two excellent collections all thoughts of “headaches” were long forgotten as I loitered in itsu, munching on salmon sushi while hating myself for wishing next Autumn would just hurry up and get here until it was time to head West for Burberry. I will be forever grateful to the generous folk at Burbs for giving me the benefit of the doubt back in 2011 and inviting me to their shows ever since. It’s always one of my major fashion month highlights and I suspect that will remain the case for as long as I’m in the biz. This season was no different and from my usual seat next to Reem Kanj of Five Five Fabulous and Emily Johnstone of Fashion Foie Gras I witnessed a whole lotta spectacle. First up, there was the thoroughly enjoyable experience of watching Anna Wintour and Bradley Cooper lolling on the FROW. Far from seeming traumatised her unplanned trip to Newcastle, La Wintour was positively beaming every time I saw her! The mind boggles… But anyway, let’s talk clothes.

Burberry Womenswear Autumn/Winter 2014 - Front Row & Show

Anna Wintour & Bradley Cooper

Burberry Womenswear Autumn/Winter 2014 - Front Row & Show

From left: Felicity Jones, Naomi Harris, Tini Tempah, Harry Styles, Alison Mossheart & Mario Testino

As Ed Sheeran’s melodious tones filled the venue (live, no soundtracks here, obvs) the first tousle haired, fair skinned model took to the catwalk adorned in a captivating abstraction. How many variations can one man conjure up based on the classic trench? In the case of Christopher Bailey, it appears the answer to that is infinite. Deconstructed, loosely flung over shoulders and adorned with painterly florals I’m not even sure you could call the latest coverups “trench coats”, they were almost too bohemian for that.

Burberry LFW 1

Burberry AW14

Flowing, barely-there silk and chiffon ensembles evoked images of carefree yet cultivated beauties, just as Bailey’s show notes citing the “Bloomsbury Girls” as his latest inspiration suggested. Silhouettes came far softer than recent seasons (remember last Autumn’s foxy homage to Christine Keeler?!) with teddy bear textures and slouchy shearling adding a sense of warmth to flimsy slips and delicately ruched evening dresses.

Burberry LFW 2

Burberry AW14

Admittedly, it was less up my sartorial street than Spring/Summer’s cinched waists and sweet pastels but that didn’t stop the show, the collection and the entire experience being anything less than magical. The ever impressive final saw Paloma Faith serenade the cast of supermodels all clad in personalised blanket coats drumming home the message that Christopher Bailey had in one full swoop delivered both his most daring, and his softest collection for Burberry yet. No one marries creativity and commercial viability quite like he does.

LFW

LFW

More from day 4 coming your way soon! For now, I’d love to hear what you think of these collections?

Love Ella. X

Posted on by Ella Catliff in Fashion Week 2 Comments

Monthly Must Haves: January 2014

january

1) Roksanda Ilincic Lisson Peplum Top, 455, click here to buy
2) MaxMara Nave Trousers, 225, click here to buy
3) Sophia Webster Nicole Sandals, 375, click here to buy
4) Johnny Loves Rosie Two Piece Drop Earring, 16, click here to buy
5) Prism Capri Sunglasses, 265, click here to buy
6) Chloe Convertible Leather Trench Coat, 5735, click here to buy
7) Proenza Schouler PS11 Mini Leather Shoulder Bag, 1160, click here to buy
8) REDValentino Monochrome Glittered Loafers, 315, click here to buy
9) Topshop Check Boucle Pelmet Skirt, 40, click here to buy
10) Topshop Betty Boucle Scallop Jacket, 68, click here to buy

Love Ella. X

Posted on by Ella Catliff in Shopping Leave a comment

LFW SS14: Day 4

Day 4 dawned sunny, bright and absolutely freezing! For some reason unbeknown to anyone even myself, I decided to do bare legs. This was perhaps due in part to the equally inexplicable fact that me, Nik and Serena stayed up until the wee hours eating Reece’s Pieces and giggling like teenagers after a few too many cocktails at the Belstaff, Purple Magazine and Dominic Jones parties. Not exactly a rock n’ roll end to the night but on the back of ten (I think) days and nights of fashion week fun, it was enough to make me feel a little on the deathly side when my alarm went off at 7am. Frost bitten knees and bleary eyes aside, there was no way in hell I’d even consider skipping show number 1, Roksanda Ilincic.

LFW

I wore: Maje shirt, AllSaints Jacket & Skirt, Massimo Dutti boots & Jaeger London bag
Image by Holly McGlynn

This season Roksanda partnered with The London Bridge Quarter, resulting in the Shard providing a suitably spectacular venue with citywide views of bright autumn morning. As one would expect from one of the city’s shining design stars, Roksanda’s FROW line up included Samantha Cameron, Natalie Massenet, Kim Hersov, Paula Reed, Ruth Chapman and just about every other major editor, buyer and fashion face on the planet. After a fairly sizeable wait – Monday morning of LFW is usually when some of the top shows take place, meaning major delays when everyone inevitably gets stuck in traffic – the first look hit the catwalk and despite my, ahem, fatigue quite how brilliant it was registered instantly.

For SS14 Roksanda Ilincic delivered acid brights, graphic prints and neon colour blocking while somehow managing to convey the air of elegance we’ve come to associate with her. Cinched waists and full skirts were paired with boxy tees and jackets in sculpted neoprene, as if to really drum home the message that Roksanda does a hell of a lot more than just cocktail dresses. Asymmetric hemlines, chiffon pleats and flowing ribbons of fabric were juxtaposed with harder edged looks featuring jagged mesh prints and intricate laser cut overskirts. Roksanda Ilincic isn’t a designer one would usually associate with embellishment but this season she went for it and her gamble paid off big time. The final looks were adorned with gob stopper plastic and gleaming gems, strikingly stunning in a way that was both harsh and compelling.

LFW SS14

Roksanda Ilincic SS14 (images via Style.com)

Other than the fact she makes really nice stuff, what I find so impressive about Roksanda Ilincic is the way she moves her aesthetic on each season. While everything she designs has a quality than is inimitably Ilincic, her past few collections have each been markedly different to what we’ve seen previously. This time around Roksanda demonstrated the scope of her skill with athletic touches and a tomboy air (enhanced by chunky, neon Nicholas Kirkwood flats) I could never have predicted but completely and utterly fell for. Judging from the thunderous round of applause that accompanied the finale, I wasn’t the only one seriously impressed by Roksanda Ilincic’s bold SS14 collection. Who knows what she’ll have for us next season? Whatever direction the designer decides to take, you can be damn sure she’ll nail it.

The only problem with holding a show halfway up a sky scraper is the issue of getting everyone back out. This was especially the case after Roksanda when we found ourselves with mere minutes to get across town for Christopher Kane and a high heeled stampede ensued. Once we’d managed to get downstairs and locate Naomi’s car it was time for one of the most panic stricken journey’s of my life. That sounds dramatic I know but come on, you just don’t miss a Kane show! After quite literally sprinting halfway around Clerkenwell we made it just in the nick of time and, oh, thank God we did. If anyone is nuts enough to still doubt the sheer, mind boggling scope of Christopher Kane’s talent this this collection should have definitely put a stop to that.

LFW SS14

Christopher Kane SS14 (Images via Style.com)

This season the designer’s starting point was, to put it simply, flowers. But of course, there’s never anything simple about a Christopher Kane collection. His blooms took the form of metal teardrop cut outs inspired by sterilised petals, arresting images of floral reproductive organs concocted from gossamer applique blooms and shimmering sylphlike bias cut slip dresses with skirts and straps contorted by embellished clips loosely referencing those one might use to examine a plant specimen. Sounds odd? Well then look at the pictures. It worked, in an exquisite, magical, how-the-HELL-did-he-think-of-this kind of way. From the razor sharp midnight black tailoring to the pastel hued slogan sweatshirts (I smell a cult hit…) to the patterns created not from print, but intricate cut out patters, everything about the show was utterly hypnotic and unlike anything else I saw here in London or across the pond. Christopher Kane took another step towards fashion world domination this season and I for one am more than happy to dress under his rule.

LFW SS14

Christopher Kane SS14 (Images via Style.com)

After what I’m sure you’ll agree was a cracking start to day three, it was time for another high speed dash across town for Marios Schwab at the Topshop venue. Since wangling my way in during my first ever LFW, I haven’t missed a Marios show and I never intend to; he just gets stronger by the season and he started off pretty damn good! A master of second skin silhouettes that mould, sculpt and enhance the female form, Marios Schwab was at his body conscious best for SS14 delivering an array of slick looks featuring carefully positioned airbrush prints. Wicker like mesh detailing and matching caps added intrigue to immaculate monochrome looks while backpack esque straps brought shimmering sequinned numbers back down to earth. Denim dresses with deliberately frayed hems sat seamlessly alongside gossamer fine lace creations and red carpet floor sweepers with meticulously embroidered underskirts that we caught a flash of as the models stalked the catwalk. If the collection’s name, “Contours” hadn’t given us the hint then the svelte sexiness that exuded from every look drummed Marios’ message home; these frocks are all woman.

LFW SS14

Marios Schwab SS14 (Images via Style.com)

Season in, season out, the Burberry Prorsum show is always a major LFW highlight for all who are lucky enough to attend. From the crisp white card invitations featuring a 3D cut out of London to the welcome email “from Christopher” all guests receive on arrival and star studded FROW to the collection and it’s reliably fabulous finale, everything about it is so perfectly done I can’t even imagine the organisation it takes to pull the whole thing off.

LFW Alexa Cheung, Poppy Delevingne, Jamal Edwards and Kevin at the Burberry Prorsum Womenswear Spring_Summer 2014 Show

Alexa Cheung, Poppy Delevingne, Jamal Edwards and Kevin Stytrom on the FROW

LFW

Anna Wintour… Like I needed to tell you that!

Gabriella Wilde, Simon Neil, Alison Mosshart, Paloma Faith, Sienna Miller, Harry Styles, Suki Waterhouse, George Barnett and Naomie Harris at the Burberry Prorsum Womenswear Spring_Summer 2014 Show

Gabriella Wilde, Simon Neil, Alison Mosshart, Paloma Faith, Sienna Miller, Harry Styles, Suki Waterhouse, George Barnett and Naomie Harris

With so many other wonderful components, it would be almost tempting to overlook the clothes themselves and it’s a true testament to Mr Bailey’s design prowess that he manages to make them standout as the star of such a spectacular show. Remember how much I adored (and still adore, it’s only September after all!) Burberry’s AW13 collection? Well my feelings for the SS14 offering are every bit as impassioned.

LFW SS14

Burberry SS14

Indeed, in some ways the looks felt like a very natural progression from the latex pencil skirts, cheeky PVC trench coats and playful heart prints Bailey put down the catwalk last season. The hint of kink remained while the autumnal colour palette had been replaced by sugar sweet pastel shades of lilac, mint and blue, dusky pink, buttery neutrals and hits of rich rose. Incidentally, the collection was entitled “English Rose”, a perfect name for some of the most deliciously, unashamedly feminine ensembles I’ve ever laid eyes on.

Burberry LFW

Burberry SS14

Figure hugging, sheer lace pencil skirts and matching buttoned up blouses played a game of peek-a-boo paired with softly cocooning knits and coats and leather grab clutches adorned with embroidered blooms. Thicker fabrics were masterfully manipulated, folded origami style to form knot front detailing or sculpted trench style evening dresses cinched at the waist by embellished belts. As the collection progressed, glittering gobstopper embellishment grew to cover trench coats and almost painfully gorgeous skirts realised in candy coloured lace. Cara Delevigne closed the show clad in a playful plastic cape. As the models made their final walk, a torrent of rose petals rained down from the ceiling to the sound of deafening applause.

Love Ella. X

Posted on by Ella Catliff in Fashion Week 3 Comments

It Started at Celine…

Let’s be honest, the “it” in question could be any number of things. Frankly it would be far easier to name the trends, garments and general fashion moods not in some way influenced by or deliberately pilfered from French arbiter of all things chic, Céline. Low key luxe (duh), wide leg trousers, socks with sandals, label free it bags, double denim, summer leather… Whether you’re shopping at Armani or Primarni, I guarantee that the genius of Phoebe Philo has reached you in some way, shape or form. This time around the taste making move in question appears not to be a trend or far reaching aesthetic (although Céline continues to kickstart those too) but a specific garment. Namely, the pink coat. Roughly this time last year Philo sent two coats down the catwalk both of which were predictably and exquisitely understated in their immaculately crafted simplicity, save for the colour. The first was a dusky pink oversized mohair creation, the second a glossy fuscia pelt. In-your-face pink is not necessarily a shade usually associated with Céline but yet it seemed so right. The pared back, modern elegance and mannish silhouettes of the garments provided the perfect foil for their deliciously bright, shamelessly pretty hues.

celine

Céline AW12

Whatever your shade of choice may be – candyfloss, powder, baby, magenta – the colour pink itself is nothing new. What struck me, and has evidently struck the rest of the fashion world too, was its place within an otherwise frill-free collection. The message was clear, pink isn’t just for girly girls and summer frocks, it can be grown up and serious too. I might be wrong (not a rare occurence) but thinking back over my shopping experiences these past few winters, there seems to have been a dirth of pink outerwear. Khaki, olive, navy, burgundy, tweed, camel, black and even scarlet all get a look in but pink coats, or at least ones that can legitimately be worn over the age of six, have been few and far between. Well, not any more. Not since Empress of all that is cool, Phoebe Philo decreed it. During AW13 fashion month pink coats cropped up on the catwalk at Jonathan Saunders, Roksanda Ilincic, John Rocha and Topshop Unique… And that was just in London! Across the pond in Paris, purveyors of Scandi minimalism Acne Studios delivered an incredible sculpted number and Guillaume Henry’s candy hued confections made him the talk of fashion week. Naturally it was Philo herself who delivered the ultimate take on the trend she kickstarted last year.

celine

From left: Jonathan Saunders, Roksanda Ilincic, Carven & Céline AW13

While I probably won’t be snapping up the Céline version or even one of Carven’s snuggly coverups (sob!) their solid presence on the AW13 runways will no doubt mean that pink coats will be all over the high street next season. Whatever your preconceptions about Barbie’s favourite hue I highly recommend trying this trend come autumn, but do avoid venturing into toddler territory by giving the pie crust collars a miss.

Love Ella. X

Posted on by Ella Catliff in Fashion Leave a comment

London Fashion Week AW13: Day 5

London Fashion Week

I wore… Skirt Suit: Boutique by Jaeger, Poloneck: Uniqlo, Boots: Massimo Dutti, Bag: Mulberry.

After a geriatrically early 8.30pm bedtime on day 4 I awoke on the final morning of London Fashion Week feeling fresh, a fairly rare occurrence as I’m sure you can imagine. First up was Anya Hindmarch, always a pretty major highlight for me because not only do I love her handbags, the woman seriously knows how to put on a show. This season’s theme was “board games” and on each of our seats we found a personalised bracelet featuring an anagram, or rather “Anyagram” of our name. Despite only being in it’s third season, the Anya Hindmarch show is a LFW must-see and everyone from Paula Reed and Alexandra Shulman to Olivia Palermo and Caroline Sieber were on the FROW. The show was a very late started thanks to pretty much every major fash ed in town having to flog their way over from Southwark where Simone Rocha had shown at 9am. I was seated third row center next to the lovely Emily Johnston of Fashion Foie Gras, placing us in prime position for people watching and later watching the spectacle unfold… And what a spectacular spectacle it was! Eventually the lights went up and all at once, the reason behind the collection’s name “Cascade” became clear as the dominoes weaving in and out of Anya’s larger-than-life board game set began to fall revealing beautiful bags which included the most adorable domino clutches. To be honest it’s impossible to describe the show in a way that does it justice so here’s the video instead.

Having shows on the hour, every hour works brilliantly when they’re all at the same venue but rather less brilliantly when they’re scattered all over town. Next on my schedule was Roksanda Ilincic, a good few miles away at The Savoy Hotel ballroom. The idea of taking the tube didn’t massively appeal given that this was my twelth day in very high heels but luckily I bumped into the Marie Claire team who offered my a lift in their car. While kicking back in a chauffer driven Mercedes was a good deal more comfortable than the Bakerloo line, we immediately found ourselves stuck in standstill traffic and very nearly missed the show. Luckily things were running behind schedule as usual and despite not even arriving at the venue until twenty minutes later than the scheduled start we made it in time to see Roksanda’s latest creations. It’s certainly been a good few seasons for the Serbian born stunner, what with dressing the likes of Michelle Obama and the Duchess of Cambridge not to mention countless famous and non famous fashion fans all over the world. Personally what I find most impressive about Ilincic is her continued efforts to develop her aesthetic when she could quite easily just produce variations along the ever-so-elegant cocktail dress theme and do enviably well. Her last two collections began to toy with texture and proportion but this time around Roksanda really pushed the boat out with form fitting cable knit wool dresses, fine tweeds, treated patent leathers and PVC galore. A decidedly non-winter palette of powder pinks and grass greens paired with rich, chocolatey browns was a bold move that certainly paid off and somehow Roksanda made oversized, acid hued hair collars seem like a very good idea indeed. Still elegant and exquisitely crafted but with a newfound hint of punk, her AW13 collection was a testament to the fact that Roksanda Ilincic is about a lot more than just glam gowns.

London Fashion Week

Roksanda Ilincic AW13

By this point I was hankering after an salmon box badly so after grabbing a copy of the AMAZE Grazia Fashion Week issue I hit the nearest itsu for a bit of R&R. My twin cravings for sushi and gossip sated, I headed to Marylebone where Matches were hosting the “House of Grazia” at their Welbeck Street HQ. Two of my fave fashion forces teaming up to deliver a series of designer Q&A’s, talks and sartorial tutorials during London Fashion Week sounded like an absolute dream but I’d been so busy I hadn’t managed to attend anything but the final session was Jonathan Saunders in conversation with Grazia’s Editor-in-Chief, Jane Bruton and there was no way in hell I was going to miss that! Despite being visibly exhausted from the strains of his show (and no doubt wild after party) a couple of evenings previously, Jonathan was every bit as charming, sincere and impressive as I remembered from the weekend I spent with him in Doha a couple of years ago.

 London Fashion Week

Jonathan Saunders in conversation with Jane Bruton

I won’t regurgitate his answers on here because you can watch the whole thing on the Grazia website but what I found most fascinating (aside from his insanely chiselled cheekbones) was Jonathan’s attitude to the creativity V commerce debate. As far as the talented Scot is concerned, fashion design is about making and selling clothes that women want to, and do, wear rather than translating a work of art onto a dress. Tempted though I was to stick around after the talk for a latte and to just generally bask in the loveliness of 23 Welbeck Street I had precisely ten minutes to get to Soho for the Ostwald Helgason presentation. I remember seeing Susanne Ostwold and Ingvar Helgason’s designs back when I first started blogging and being seriously impressed with their work and not understanding why it never seemed to crop up again. Until now that is. After two truly terrible years during which they lost the majority of their stockists and had their request to show on the London Fashion Week schedule and their application for the NewGen sponsorship requested, Ostwold Helgason are back with a vengeance, some forty five stockists and legions of stylish devotees. Having showcased their AW13 collection in New York the previous week, the design duo brought their new season wares to Blighty where Moda Operandi’s Artistic Director Taylor Tomasi Hill was hosting a tea party-cum-presentation for them at Kettners.

London Fashion Week

London Fashion Week

Since starting showing in the Big Apple last February, the label’s cool, covetable and ultra wearable aesthetic has really started to be recognised as the ingenius fashion formula it is. This time around they delivered an array of bold and beautifully crafted pieces that exuded a playful yet practical modernity. With its crisp collared shirt-dresses, stratement knits and eye-popping, tomboy tailoring the latest Ostwald Helgason looked a little like the love child of Carven and Opening Ceremony. Suffice to say, they’ve definitely got one more devotee in me.

Much like every other day of fashion week, I didn’t have any time to hang around on Tuesday afternoon. After grabbing a snap with star of Sh*t Fashion Girls Say, P’TRIQUE, who just so happened to walk in at that moment, I leapt in the nearest cab and made a mad dash to Somerset House for my final show of the season, Maria Grachvogel. Maria’s is another of the shows I’ve attended for a good five seasons now and it’s been really interesting to see how she repeatedly puts a fresh spin on her signature fluid drapery. This season the designer looked to “the beauty of winter decay and introspection provoked by witnessing the changing seasons” for inspiration, resulting in a collection that progressed from rich autumnal hues of mustard and white-on-black botanical prints to sombre shades of lichen, bone, oxblood (another AW13 obsession) and deepest teal. There was something beautifully melancholic about the collection, with haunting barren tree motifs barely visible on fragile chiffon creations. It was a striking departure from SS13′s pastel hued prettiness and the season before’s deco glamour. Personally what I was wowed by Maria’s introduction of a new tailored silhouette, who’d have guessed that a designer who’d spent two decades doing dreamy drapery could deliver such a fierce cinched waist peplum dress? Texture provided another point of intrigue as besides flowing fabrics such as chiffon and softest jersey the collection also featured woven jacquards, degrade wool, printed velvet and some truly excellent knitwear. But just as a shearling lined, belted coat paired with cigarette pants had me wondering whether we’d seen the last of Maria’s trademark frocks she closed the show with a billowing, ethereal floor sweeper, confirming at least in my mind that this was one of her most impressive collections yet.

London Fashion Week

Maria Grachvogel AW13

So, after God knows how many shows, presentations, Starbucks lattes and glasses of champagne, fashion week had drawn to a close. Or at least for me it had. Much as I wished I was doing Milan and Paris, at the Moda Operandi tea Caroline Issa mentioned that she would be flying out at 6am the next morning and I certainly didn’t envy her that! I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my antics and never fear, I’ve got a few more exciting things to share over the next few months.

Love Ella. X

Posted on by Ella Catliff in Fashion Week 6 Comments